Bend Bulletin Article on Crooked River Flows

A reporter at the Bend Bulletin saw my post on the potential for a fish kill on the Crooked River this winter and wrote this article.  If you’ve ever been quoted for an article you know how it can be a frustrating experience.  So it almost goes without saying that I would have written the story differently but I think the reporter did a good job overall of capturing the big picture of what is currently happening on the Crooked River and the challenges it faces this winter.

 

 

Steelhead Returns and a Climate Change Denying Environmental Group

D Steel 10.31.18

October through the end of the year is one of my favorite times to fish the lower Deschutes River.  The crowds are gone and the trout are still there.  On Halloween a friend and I had a good day.  One of the trout I landed measured at just under 18”.  The bonus was this hatchery steelhead which was a thrill to land using trout gear.  Nevertheless, the outlook for wild Deschutes steelhead remains bleak.Read More »

Another fish kill coming to the Crooked?

Crooked in winter

As Central Oregon anglers know, fish populations in the Crooked River can wildly fluctuate.  When there is adequate flow for a few years the fishing can be excellent.  On the other hand, a variety of factors including low flows combined with freezing temperatures can create massive fish kills.  The last of these events happened in the winter of 2015-2016 when trout populations dropped from 1,383/km to 185/km, the lowest ever recorded.  Based on current water management plans, such a kill could happen again this winter.Read More »

The end of local seafood?

I have written about ocean warming and the dramatic decline in steelhead and salmon populations.  Most recently, I posted about commercial salmon fishing belatedly being declared an official disaster.  Here’s a related NOAA report and a State of Oregon report on ocean acidification.  Scientists have had a clear understanding of global warming for 40 years but we continue to study the problem.  I just don’t get it: you don’t study fire while watching your house burn down.Read More »

BSWG, Irrigators, and the Betrayal of the Common Good

The Basin Study Work Group was a multiyear study of water issues, primarily centered on the upper Deschutes River, which concluded last week.  The Deschutes River Conservancy did an excellent job of shepherding the effort, producing valuable studies that added to our knowledge of how water is managed and strategies that could be used to conserve it, although none of them are required to be implemented.  The final meeting ended with participants congratulating each other for a job well done which, for me, crystallized the failures of the process, including the catastrophic draining of Wickiup Reservoir this summer.

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Deschutes Wild Steelhead Update

Unfortunately, as of the end of September things still look pretty bleak for wild fish this season.  The trap at Sherars Falls has captured a total of 44 wild steelhead.  Only 3 of these have made it to the the trap at the bottom of the Pelton Round Butte complex (Lake Billy Chinook, etc.).  Two of those are actually hatchery steelhead that were released above Lake Billy Chinook but did not have their adipose fins clipped.  As I detailed in a series of posts starting here, these fish could be on a path to extinction in the not too distant future.

Salmon Now Officially a “Disaster”

The US Secretary of Commerce has declared that commercial salmon fishing along the west coast from 2015 through 2017 was a disaster.  (It’s no better this year and steelhead are also in critical condition.)  The determination provides economic assistance for commercial fishing communities.  This recognition is welcome but it seems to me that it would be equally important to fix the root causes.  Without this the desired “rebound” will not occur.