Another Poor Steelhead Year?

Yesterday ODFW released their projections for 2019 summer salmon and steelhead returns for the Columbia River basin.  The outlook is for another bleak year.  “Due to the low projected returns for upriver summer steelhead, additional protective regulations are needed this fall including a one steelhead daily bag limit and area-specific steelhead retention closures. The rolling 1-2 month closures start in August and progress upriver following the steelhead return to reduce take of both hatchery and wild fish. These closures affect the mainstem Columbia and the lower reaches of specific tributaries.”  This includes the Deschutes below Moody where only one hatchery steelhead may be kept all year (June 16 – December 31) but none from August 1 to September 31.

CORRECTED: Final Steelhead Numbers

The official Deschutes steelhead season is from April 1 to March 31, so the 2018/2019 season is now over.  Today, PGE released their March monthly newsletter which stated that a total of 35 upper basin origin adult steelhead returned and were passed above the Pelton Round Butte project and released into Lake Billy Chinook.  Clearly, this is a dismal number.  You can see the number of smolts that were released downstream here.  Assuming that adult returns were from 2016 smolts that’s a return rate of only 0.87% (not 8.7%, I missed a decimal point in the original post).  There is hope for some improvement in the adult return count, however, if not the percentage.  In 2017 and 2018 steelhead smolt counts were much higher.  2017 was a better water year and in both years more smolts were planted.  Starting next year only smolts will be planted.  Read more about this here.

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Upper Basin Anadromous Fry Stocking

 

Crooked River Canyon
Lower Crooked River Canyon

This spring marks the last stocking of fry as part of the upper Deschutes Basin salmon and steelhead reintroduction effort. Yesterday I was part of the crew helping with the final chinook salmon fry stocking and backpacked fry into the lower Crooked River canyon as well as where Alder Springs meets Whychus Creek not far from the middle Deschutes. As I wrote about here, the reintroduction effort has been a disappointment for many reasons one of which is the unsuccessful fry stocking effort and a new approach is needed.Read More »

Oregon Chapter American Fisheries Society Meeting and Another SWW

Last week the Oregon Chapter of the American Fisheries Society held their annual meeting in Bend.  I attended the 21 presentations on Water & Climate.  I’ll make a few posts with highlights and, hopefully, some copies of presentations I have requested.  One of the presentations was on the unintended consequences of  selective water withdrawal at Cougar Dam on the South Fork of the McKenzie River.  There are some interesting analogues to what is happening on the Deschutes.Read More »

The Osprey and a Critique

The latest issue of The Osprey is now available.  If you like to read scientific articles about steelhead and salmon conservation, mostly in the Pacific Northwest, then this is the journal for you.  I encourage you to subscribe and help keep them going.  This issue has a couple of articles that once again illustrate the peril facing anadromous fish in many PacNW river systems.  It also contains an article on the lower Deschutes River which I found problematic.  Read More »

Two Good Reads

As I say in the “About” section of this blog, I believe that WaterWatch is the most important water conservation organization in Oregon.  They have done amazing work to restore flows, breach dams, and protect groundwater.  Their latest newsletter is well worth reading.  The Osprey is an excellent, research-based publication for anyone interested in anadromous fish in the Pacific Northwest and beyond.  The September issue is filled with great data, including the statement that the full cost of every hatchery steelhead returning to the Columbia Basin is on the order of $1,000, while degrading the opportunity for wild fish to recover.  I have read this issue a couple of times now and underlined much of it.

Steelhead Returns and a Climate Change Denying Environmental Group

D Steel 10.31.18

October through the end of the year is one of my favorite times to fish the lower Deschutes River.  The crowds are gone and the trout are still there.  On Halloween a friend and I had a good day.  One of the trout I landed measured at just under 18”.  The bonus was this hatchery steelhead which was a thrill to land using trout gear.  Nevertheless, the outlook for wild Deschutes steelhead remains bleak.Read More »