Opal Springs Fish Passage Video

The fish ladder at the Opal Springs Hydroelectric Project at the mouth of the Crooked River is nearing completion.  Scheduled to go online this fall, volitional passage could be a huge shot in the arm for reintroduction efforts as the overwhelming majority of adult steelhead and chinook passed into Lake Billy Chinook try to go up the Crooked.  The Crooked River Watershed Council has released this video about the passage project which is worth viewing.Read More »

Fisheries Workshop Highlights

The 25th annual Pelton Round Butte Fisheries Workshop was the past two days.  I have been going for years and, as usual, it was an overwhelming amount of information.  I plan to follow up with some of the presenters to get a better understanding of their data and hope to have more detailed posts soon.  In the meantime, here’s a quick list of the highlights from my perspective.Read More »

PGE Water Quality Study

Portland General Electric’s long awaited lower Deschutes River water quality study was recently released.  At over 600 pages it took me some time to get through, here are my initial impressions.  This study is critically important to the ongoing effort to reintroduce anadromous fish into the upper Deschutes Basin and the operation of the Selective Water Withdrawal tower.  Also note that the Deschutes River Alliance’s lawsuit against PGE/CTWS (dismissed but under appeal) is based on allegations of water quality violations.  The author of the water quality study will present and answer questions at the upcoming Fisheries Workshop. Read More »

Reintroduction: Time for a Change in Strategy

After 10 years of effort it is clear that the current approach to reintroducing anadromous fish into the upper Deschutes Basin above the Pelton Round Butte project is not producing acceptable results.  Fisheries managers acknowledge this but often state that it will take more time.  They reply that it has been over 50 years since these fish were cut off from their traditional spawning grounds and reintroduction is a complex problem.  This is true, but I believe the current dire state of steelhead returns to the Deschutes River should provide impetus to take bolder action.  This is a long post, but worth reading if you care about the future of steelhead in the Deschutes River.Read More »

Whychus Creek status

Camp Polk Meadow

(I stole the photo of Camp Polk Meadow Preserve and Whychus Creek from the Deschutes Land Trust website.  Photo credit: Russ McMillan.)

When the reintroduction effort began a major focus was the restoration of Whychus Creek, a tributary of the middle Deschutes.  The thought was that steelhead in particular would target Whychus as they are not native to the Metolius and the Crooked River is blocked by Opal Springs Dam.  Restoring Whychus Creek would also provide dramatically improved habitat for wild, native species, in particular redband trout.  This restoration effort was spearheaded by the Deschutes Partnership who purchased sections of the creek for restoration, worked on restoring flows, and performed habitat improvement, along with state and federal agencies.  It was and continues to be a long-term, expensive effort.  Some progress has been made but there’s still a long way to go.Read More »

2018 Fisheries Workshop – Opal Springs

5 Rip Rap 2Last week was the annual Pelton Round Butte Fisheries Workshop.  Once again, it was an information filled conference with presentations covering a wide range of fisheries issues encompassing the entire Deschutes Basin.  I am going to spend a few weeks digging into some of the presentations, I have many follow up questions for some of the presenters, but there were a few topics that are quick and easy to report on, like Opal Springs fish passage.Read More »

DLT’s Ochoco Preserve

This afternoon I was able to tour the Deschutes Land Trust’s new Ochoco Preserve.  The preserve is currently farmland just outside Prineville that will be converted to wetlands over the next decade or so.  It is where McKay and Ochoco Creeks meet the Crooked River.  The potential for new, high quality habitat for native redband trout is very exciting.  These creeks were also important spawning areas for anadromous Chinook salmon and steelhead and may be again once the fish ladder at Opal Springs Dam is complete.  I encourage you to visit the DLT’s site, learn more, and become a member if you are able.